September 16th, 2010

You can’t photograph me, I know my rights

Posted in The Job - General by 200

Don’t ya love human rights?

The latest protection the human rights lot are spouting for the protection of criminals comes today from Northern Ireland.

Following the Belfast riots this summer the Police Service of Northern Ireland published photos of 23 people they wanted to identify in their investigations to pursue those responsible for violent behaviour.

The Policing Board of Northern Ireland has taken legal advice in relation to the tactic & told the police not to do it again if there is any prospect that the those pictured are under the age of 18, because “it would breach their human rights”. Presumably that’s the right to lob bricks at people’s heads & get away with it.

In another case, police issued over 200 photos of people wanted for public order & violence offences. As a result they made 150 arrests & of those 145 were either charged or reported. 40 of those were found to be under 18. The PSNI have been told not to use this method of investigation unless there are exceptional circumstances.

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8 comments

  1. Ambulance Amateur says:

    The use of photos can have some unusual legal complications.

    HOWEVER, a photograph taken in a public place cannot, if used in some later publication, be considered private. If you wish to walk down a public road with your dong hanging out, photographs of said organ could be published (subject to publishing decency regulations).

    If someone commits a violent act in public and that act is photographed, there is no privacy case to be considered. Even if there is no criminal act pictured, photographs in a public place can be published nem. con.

    September 17th, 2010 at 00:06

  2. RogBoy says:

    I do love human rights.

    I don’t love the extension of human rights to scumbags.

    We, as a society, need to start questioning this cowardly assumption offenders are entitled to the same rights as non-offenders. We need to ask for a real reason why an offender’s picture cannot be published – saying its against their rights is not enough. Those making such statements need to really read the human rights convention – *anyones* rights can be contradicted in the the course of lawful investigation.

    September 17th, 2010 at 00:19

  3. boy on a bike says:

    How about my human right to walk peacefully down the road without a pack of idiots chucking bricks and petrol bombs around? I’d say my right to go peacefully about my business over rules any pseudo right to be violent and then avoid being identified.

    I’d prefer that they were photographed using something like this:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QRYwMrsaLxs

    September 17th, 2010 at 11:39

  4. Ex-Peeler says:

    I served in Belfast MSU/TSG for many years, and found myself at the Ardoyne every 12th July. One of the reasons the Policing Board has forbidden the future publishing of photos is that some people could be “Innocent Bystanders”

    After the first 30 seconds of disorder, anyone who did not wish to be involved would have left. Rioting with such intensity is a messy business and the chance of injury to an observer is fairly high. Anyone who is still in view of Police/CCTV cameras in the area, obviously wants to be there. It should also be noted that the picture of faces published are those taken when the scarves/masks worn have slipped off.

    Human Rights should cease to exist during involvement in crime.

    September 17th, 2010 at 13:08

  5. Civ_In_The_City says:

    “The PSNI have been told not to use this method of investigation unless there are exceptional circumstances”.

    I`m an average MOP. I consider a riot to be exceptional circumstances.

    September 17th, 2010 at 17:59

  6. Tony F says:

    Human rights, my arse. As soon as you commit a crime against another person, you forfeit any rights.

    September 17th, 2010 at 18:20

  7. the_leander says:

    “The Policing Board of Northern Ireland has taken legal advice in relation to the tactic & told the police not to do it again if there is any prospect that the those pictured are under the age of 18, because “it would breach their human rights”.”

    Who exactly is giving this advice?

    Because as far as I’m aware if you are in a public place, you have no right to privacy. Even if they’re under 18, unless they are posing in a sexually provocative manner and or in a state of undress, I can’t see any legal reason why there would be an exception for them.

    September 17th, 2010 at 20:05

  8. The Baker says:

    Staggering in it’s stupidity. One of these fine days, some of these smart-arses will be on the receiving end of a crime and all of a sudden the desire for ‘yuman rights’ will disappear in the breeze!

    September 18th, 2010 at 14:34

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