January 25th, 2007

A New Breed of Eco-Warriors

Posted in Not the Job by 200

It’s with a deep sense of pride that I can report on the selfless deeds of some of my fellow citizens.

It seems the Dunkirk Spirit is alive and well so let’s put aside for a moment all the talk of the chavs and the underclass and the ‘me,me,me’ society which prevails in our modern times.

I talk of course of that happy band of brothers and sisters who, while the majority sat on their arses at home watching events unfold, without a moment’s thought for their own safety, bravely mounted the pebbly beraches at Branscombe in Devon to assist in what must surely be South Devon’s worst disaster of 2007.

As the disaster of the partial sinking of the MSC Napoli unfolded hordes of willing volunteers headed towards the danger while everyone else just looked on.

It seems that the RSPB, Devon Wildlife Trust and the British Trust for Ornithology must have called in all their favours as almost every single member rallied round to assist in averting what could have become one of Britains worst eco-disasters this century.

"I’m doing it for the birdies" a solemn faced volunteer said to reporters as he carried off 200 packs of sodden nappies. "If we don’t remove these toxic trainers from the vicinity", said another "god knows what damage they’d do stuck down the throat of a baby guillemot."

Sweating and panting almost to the point of exhaustion, John Shite took a moment’s break to talk to to me. "Well, it’s taken me 15 hours but I’ve got that bloody BMW bike up the cliff. These things are lethal to the inshore marine life, I mean, do you know how many hundred years these things take to rot away?"

Jade Slapper, who had travelled all the way from Essex was only too happy to assist. "Well, when Darren said all this detritus was lying around the beach I was only too happy to help. We’ve been here 2 days now and managed to fill 3 transits with Nike trainers and a few windscreens. You gotta remove them, if the sun shines through those brand new glass windscreens they could set fires and fings, I mean, it’s dangerous to leave ’em there, innit".

We counted about 200 of the volunteers working day and night to clear the beach and bring it back into some kind of safe environment for the flora and fauna.

One member of the team wasn’t happy that so many others were willing to sit at home and watch it on their TVs. "Well, we could do with a few more people down here, like. There’s about 20 more containers we haven’t even broken into yet and if it takes 12 men to get a BMW off the beach we could be here for another 3 weeks."

We spoke to a group who had travelled all the way from Liverpool as they took a break from removing wheels off their mate’s trannies. I asked where all the dangerous items were going to be disposed. "Yeah, no, you can’t just stick it in a  landfill, like, irresponsible. Recycling, that’s the answer. Personally I’ve recycled almost 2 tons of goodies, I mean, rubbish on eBay."

The great British public, gotta admire ’em!
 

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