March 16th, 2009

Roosting Chickens

Posted in The Job - Comment by 200

It seems that Yousaf Bashir has upset a few people in Luton. You’ll remember Yousaf’s group, they’re the small group of Muslim ‘fundamentalists’ who called the Royal Anglian Regiment a bunch of child-killing murderers who should go to hell.

Yousaf lives in the town with his parents. It appears a group of anti-Ahlus Sunnah wal Jamaah fundamentalists have been so annoyed at Bashir’s antics that they’ve put a few windows in at Bashir’s home.

Whilst one can probably understand people’s disgust with this particular group, going round their house to put the fear of, er, Allah, into the chap has probably only resulted in smashing up his parent’s home, who probably have nothing to do with Bashir’s views, and have also put fear into every one else in the street who now wonder whether a bunch of errant vigilianties will put their windows in by mistake (they’re probably not the most intellgent folk – the smash-ors, not the smash-ees). Mind you. I suppose it wold be quite hard to mistake the Bashir’s property since seven of his neighbours in the cul-de-sac have put Union Jack bunting out of their windows.

Bedfordshire Police provided an overnight guard at the house after the damage on Friday night, when neighbours reported ‘suspicious activity’ the following day. Only Beds Police don’t call it a free 24-hour guard, they prefer to call it a ‘police watch‘ which doesn’t sound like they are providing any better service to the Bashir’s than they do to anyone else who gets their windows put in (which they actually are – I can’t recall anyone else getting a personal police officers stood outside the house for what in effect amounts to a couple of hundred quid’s worth of damage, even ‘normal’ victims of racial abuse/damage, don’t get this level of service.)

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5 comments

  1. Tony F says:

    It’s his parents I feel sorry for. I suggest they sling him out. I fear that we shall see more and more of this sort of thing. The Police will, of course, be blamed. The government will make sound bites, the liberals will wring their hands, The BNP will be out for blood. Did I mention the Police will get the blame?

    March 16th, 2009 at 19:01

  2. Blueknight says:

    The public perception of this incident is that the protesters got away with it. Some people see them as enemies of the state or at least ’5th columnists, so something like this was just a matter of time really. I have sympathy for any ‘innocent’ person who is picked on by anyone who might think that person is Bashir, or that he holds the same views as Bashir.
    I saw Baroness Warsi on Question Time, – she was very critcal of the protesters and called them criminals. A breath of fresh air in these PC times

    March 16th, 2009 at 20:19

  3. pchawkeye says:

    Passing attention, routine visits I could accept but 24 hr guard? If Beds are that worried about him I suggest he and his cohorts be taken into ‘protective custody’ for their own safety, Belmarsh perhaps.

    March 16th, 2009 at 20:21

  4. Civ_In_The_City says:

    I`m not altogether convinced that Mr Bashirs claims are entirely founded in fact. I suspect there may be elements of his allegations which, if placed under objective scrutiny, would prove highly inaccurate and possibly misleading.

    It may not have been his intention to exaggerate, or to depict the Royal Anglian Regiment in an un-wholesome light, but I fear that independent witnesses may have been given an impression of the conduct of the regiment that does not reflect the true account of their role or activities.

    As a resident in a country where free speech is celebrated, I`m sure Mr Bashir won`t mind if I offer some constructive criticism of his speech and offer some guidance for making a better fist of it next time.

    Firstly, at least from the television pictures I saw, it seems he did not fully engage the attention of everyone present. Perhaps they were too busy watching the parading soldiers. In effective public speaking timing is everything and Mr Bashir should instead pick a day when better organised entertainment is not already under way.

    A large crowd is essential if you are serious about getting your message across, equally one should endeavour to practice any speech in front of a sympathetic audience before going public.

    Mr Bashir could ask his Mummy and Daddy to stand in as a practice audience to ensure that the tone of the speech is suitably pitched. Mummy and Daddy Bashir might also like to practice throwing rotten fruit or eggs at little Yousaf to prepare him for a hostile crowd reaction. It`s safer than bullets Yousaf!

    Next, it is often a good idea to elevate oneself above the eyeline of the crowd before you begin speaking. This ensures that you are able to make that all important eye contact with your audience. You might consider taking along a milk crate or soap box for this purpose. It also ensures the crowd get a clean shot.

    Thorough research cannot be under-estimated, make sure you have a full and balanced understanding of your subject matter. Your arguments will be far more convincing if they are not perceived to be entirely one-sided. You will also avoid crowd criticism and claims that you are ‘talking out of your arse’.

    Some famous leaders choose to present their more contentious speeches via video tape, from anonymous locations in far-flung countries. This has its downside, international air travel is expensive and your increased carbon-footprint may lose you the green vote. On the upside your words of earth-shattering wisdom will live on forever in the heaving multi-terabyte brain-dump morass of YouTube in amongst dwarf-hurling and carpet slipper fetishists.

    Over time, and with practice, you will learn what parts of a speech work well with a crowd and which do not. If your speeches result in physical injury, violence against your person, property damage to your own or relatives houses, condemnation throughout the national press and satirical comments on popular blogs, perhaps poor presentation is not the problem.

    Public speaking is not for everyone, so even though you feel passionate about your cause and you are keen to see things improve maybe you should consider other outlets for your message. The usual British response is to mumble under your breath ‘bloody government’ and then get on with things. But you can also write to your local newspaper, stand for election to your local council, email your MP and ask him or her to do what they can on your behalf.

    Getting you and your mates on the telly yelling your fuzzy little faces off and making an absolute twat of yourself is generally ineffective.

    March 16th, 2009 at 21:19

  5. Sergeant T Twining says:

    Now because of this boy’s antics Bashir’s family need protecting. Just whom is protecting whom?

    March 17th, 2009 at 09:55

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